John Ben DeVette's Blog

Thoughts experiences & learnings about the world of academic publishing …

XML: A SIMPLE & SHORT INTRODUCTION for people who want to understand WHY IS XML SO IMPORTANT?

Attached is a brief, 7-slide PowerPoint presentation explaining in very simple English why XML is important to publishers, authors, universities, and almost anyone who is creating content to be loaded onto websites, published as an e-book, stored in a digital archive / institutional repository, or needs to be findable via Google or other search engines.

[This PowerPoint presentation is a excerpt of a longer presentation I gave to the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) on 2010 September 17, entitled:  FUTURE TRENDS OF ACADEMIC PUBLISHING:  Creating an Efficient Access & Distribution System for Japan’s Research Output.  A copy of the JST presentation has been translated into Japanese and is available either from JST or by contacting me directly.]

4 October 2010 Posted by | Archival, Digital Publishing, Self Publishing, University Publishing | , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

The Future Library Should Focus on Collecting and Formatting In-house, Locally Created Content

My vision for the future library is to have it focus on collecting and formating all local content into a single knowledge base. When all content: data sets, science notebook, papers, books, reports, manuals, blogs are part of the same knowledge base, then the archive, search, and distribution interfaces are easily managed and updated as technology evolves. In concept, this is similar to what Adam Bly refers to as a “digital core,” but Adam’s vision is global. The focus here is making the local institution’s in-house content future friendly.

27 April 2010 Posted by | Archival, Digital Publishing, University Publishing | , , , , , | Leave a comment

Yale Launches Course for the Book and Magazine Publishing Industry

The famous Stanford University publishing course SPPC  (Stanford Professional Publishing Course) was discontinued in 2009.  But New York based helmsman Robert Baensch stays involved with the new Yale start-up.   Yale’s new program, called simply “The Yale Publishing Course,”  intends to replace and supersede Stanford’s previous 5-day summer program by placing more emphasis on new technologies and digital publishing.

The new Yale course was just announced last week, and as yet no curriculum or syllabus is available online, but the focus remains helping commercial publishers adapt to a changing world.  The intended customer for the annual course will be publishing industry executives.

Open Access models will be covered, but I am curious to see if Yale will include a session on the new campus-based publishing movement which many academics and university administrators view as a direct, albeit fledgling competitor to the traditional publishing industry.

Link to the press release:

Yale Launches Course for the Book and Magazine Publishing Industry.

7 April 2010 Posted by | Digital Publishing | , , | Leave a comment

INTERDISCIPLINARY LEARNING EXERCISE for Archivists, Archivalists, Perpetrators of National Memory Projects, Storage Fans, and People Who Are Losing their Memory

Gizmodo.com has collected an excellent series of websites and videos that all pertain to memory: human, machine and corporate. Entertaining and instructive at the same time.
Here it is: http://gizmodo.com/tag/memoryforever

If you’re not sure you want to spend the time watching each video, here is an 2-minute summary article “The Future of Memory” from the New York Times online edition which includes a few of the more popular items. Here is the link to the NYT article: http://tiny.cc/oBPmr

Enjoy!

23 March 2010 Posted by | Archival, Digital Publishing | , , | Leave a comment

Online Journals / E-Journals Work Better Without Issue Numeration

Technical piece about ONLINE JOURNAL NUMERATION – The term (Annual, Quarterly, Monthly, etc.) have no relavance with e-journals. Date and ARTICLE NUMBER, and if possible a form of pagination (page numbers) is best.

Eric Hellman writes:

An increasingly popular alternative to publish-before-print is print-oblivious article numbering. Publishers following this practice do not assign issue numbers or page numbers, and instead assign article numbers when the version-of-record is first produced. Downstream bibliographic systems have not universally adjusted to this new practice; best paractices for article numbers are described in an NFAIS Report on Publishing Journal Articles (pdf 221KB).Eric Hellman, Go To Hellman, Nov 2009

You should read the whole article.

3 December 2009 Posted by | Digital Publishing | , | 1 Comment

   

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